A Prey Model raw blog for dogs, cats and ferrets (also their owners). Raw feeding is based on long-term pet health and carnivore physiology. I post tips about how to start Prey Model Raw, the benefits of a healthy unprocessed diet, where to locate cheap meat and how to easily create a complete diet. Good nutrition is the very foundation of good long-term health. Pet diets should be based on what they thrive on, instead of what they can simply survive on.

Feel free to ask any questions about raw feeding. Check out my FAQ below.

Useful Links:
Complete Starters Guide

Starter guide is aimed at dogs but 80/10/10 ratio applies to cats/ferrets too. Just disregard recreational bone feeding for cats/ferrets, and feed edible bone instead.

Why Feed Raw?

Raw Feeding Myths

Felinenutrition.org

Kibble Ingredients Diagram

Learn about your current pet food here

 

Pro-raw Pro-health: Vets
Many in the veterinary field today are unknowingly being influenced by large multi-billion dollar pet food corporations. These corporations target vet students and clinics, providing sponsorship, partnerships and worst of all - “nutrition” classes. Thankfully there are many vets who support the basic premise of nutrient dense, unprocessed raw wholefood for dogs.
'Raw chicken does of course carry bacteria, E.g. - Salmonella. These are of absolutely no consequence to a healthy dog.'-Dr. Ian Billinghurst DVM

'Despite our domestication of the canine and feline and the fact that a Chihuahua may not look much like a wolf, the truth is that we haven't changed their gastrointestinal systems. Cats and dogs are carnivores, designed to eat meat, bones and the intestinal contents of their prey.'-Dr Susan Krakauer DVM



The British Journal of Small Animal Practice: ‘A growing number of vets state that processed pet food is the main cause of illness and premature death in the modern dog and cat. In December 1995, the British Journal of Small Animal Practice published a paper contending that processed pet food suppresses the immune system and leads to liver, kidney, heart and other diseases. This research, initially conducted by Dr Tom Lonsdale, was researched further by the Australian Veterinary Association and proven to be correct.’-Canine Health Concern

'Salmonella has even been found in samples of commercial pet foods & treats. Bacteria is not a problem for a pet with a strong immune system, & a strong immune system is encouraged by eating species-appropriate raw food.'-Kymythy Schultze CCN

More here: Source

Pro-raw Pro-health: Vets

Many in the veterinary field today are unknowingly being influenced by large multi-billion dollar pet food corporations. These corporations target vet students and clinics, providing sponsorship, partnerships and worst of all - “nutrition” classes. Thankfully there are many vets who support the basic premise of nutrient dense, unprocessed raw wholefood for dogs.

'Raw chicken does of course carry bacteria, E.g. - Salmonella. These are of absolutely no consequence to a healthy dog.'-Dr. Ian Billinghurst DVM

'Despite our domestication of the canine and feline and the fact that a Chihuahua may not look much like a wolf, the truth is that we haven't changed their gastrointestinal systems. Cats and dogs are carnivores, designed to eat meat, bones and the intestinal contents of their prey.'-Dr Susan Krakauer DVM
The British Journal of Small Animal Practice: ‘A growing number of vets state that processed pet food is the main cause of illness and premature death in the modern dog and cat. In December 1995, the British Journal of Small Animal Practice published a paper contending that processed pet food suppresses the immune system and leads to liver, kidney, heart and other diseases. This research, initially conducted by Dr Tom Lonsdale, was researched further by the Australian Veterinary Association and proven to be correct.’-Canine Health Concern
'Salmonella has even been found in samples of commercial pet foods & treats. Bacteria is not a problem for a pet with a strong immune system, & a strong immune system is encouraged by eating species-appropriate raw food.'-Kymythy Schultze CCN

(Source: raw-fed-pets)


littlevikingbigworld asked
Hey guys! Thanks for the swift reply. I'm having some difficulty finding what adjustments need to be made for a large breed pup. My boy is almost 7 months old, so he will still need DHA if I recall correctly. What would you suggest eventually feeding after the initial transition phase to include such?

Hi, fish oil is a good source of EPA/DHA so perhaps you could look into that. You can just add part of a capsule to his meat so it’s quite convenient too. Here is a post I made awhile ago about dosages and how to choose a good fish oil. :)

Anonymous asked
hi there! my dog and cat have been on raw for a few months now, and they have adjusted very well. i recently bought some fish oil supplements for them, and i was hoping to put the fish oil on beef heart for my cat since she has refused to eat beef heart otherwise. i was wondering if you know how often i should feed these capsules? each one is 1200mg.

Hi fish oil certainly has its benefits so it’s a great inclusion to a raw diet. I made this post awhile ago about choosing fish oil and also dosages. Its important not to overdo it becuase too much can deplete Vitamin E levels. The best way is to read the back of the fish oil and measure based on the EPA/DHA levels stated there. It will just have to be approximate too. Also open up a capsule and smell it to make sure its not rancid, as rancid fish oil has the opposite effect (damaging/cancer causing free radicals). Once you’ve opened the capsule to get out the right amount, dont save the remaining oil either becuase it will go rancid quickly once opened. :)

iambadmilk asked
I never really considered how bad shelf food was for my pet until I came across this blog and I can't thank you enough. I immediately began making changes to my pets diet and now I'm blown away to see a hefty price of $100+ on science brand biscuits.

That’s awesome, its always cool to hear from other owners who found my blog useful. Raw feeding is definitely the cheaper way to go; I fed Science Diet once upon a time but now I wouldnt touch it with a 10 foot pole haha.

lesbianfightclub asked
Also I keep forgetting to ask; the health food store near me sells whole fish. Once I get my dogs transitioned fully can I just drop a fish in front of them for a meal? I know you can with other prey, but yeh. (Also I know to freeze salmon first.)

Yep you sure can when its from a human-grade source and not straight out of the wild. Sardines are a really good whole fish to feed too. The bones in raw fish are very small, soft and digestible.You might just have to introduce it slowly though as some dogs get initial stomach upset from fish. :)

Anonymous asked
Do you have any good links to feeding dalmatians? Or just low purine diets in general...? I wanna minimize the purine intake as much as possible and idk how to do with all the organs... And do you know any good alternatives to liver to get vitamin A? thanks!

Hi Ive heard this is a common concern with Dalmatians as a breed. There are a lot of owners out there who feed raw successfully however most avoid beef meat, large game (venison), all organs, and occasionally lamb. Instead they feed chicken, turkey, other poultry, and eggs/fish a few times a week. The best idea to replace the nutritional value of organs would be a broad spectrum multivitamin that is designed to be adequate for canine long-term use. Not sure of any specific brands as I live in NZ, but there are a lot available online. Synthetic nutrients arent preferable for normal dogs but since your Dalmatian cannot have organs it would be essential in order to prevent deficiencies. Just be sure to read reviews and check the quality of ingredients used (maybe your vet even sells them?). Locating a holistic vet or vet naturopath nearby might be very useful too as they can help you tailor the diet around it and monitor his urinary PH. A lot of owners also buy sticks that allow them to test it at home, which is useful for finding the normal range for their dog and monitoring ph levels. It is also recommended that you add water to your dogs food in order to dilute the urine. :)

List of high purine foods

Info about protein vs purine

Raw feeding dalmatians (Barf, but still relevant)

Owner discusses raw feeding her dal

Monitoring urine ph & raw feeding dalmatians


lesbianfightclub asked
Hi I saw a question about someone having a hard time finding green tripe. I know pet people sells canned green tripe. I can't remember the brand but I'm going there tomorrow and I can look then? Idk if canned tripe is as good... ?

Hi yeah I guess it depends on where you live, as to its availability unfortunately. Canned green tripe wont be as good as fresh as usually it is cooked/heat processed, however it can still be beneficial for your dog or cat. Depending on any preservatives/additives used it may certainly be a good inclusion, as opposed to not feeding it. :)

littlevikingbigworld asked
Hi there! I'm a lover of prey-model raw diet but, unfortunately, my mother seems to view the whole thing as barbaric. She's convinced if I feed my pup raw, he'll rip her arm off while playing. :-/ She's also worried about salmonella. My pup needs a high protein diet due to his breed and raw, honestly, is the best for him. How can I bring her to terms with this? My only real option is to try and feed him raw when she's not home but I know she'll try to feed him bowls of grain-free kibble.

Hi the raw feeding myth index may be of use in this situation especially these: Bacteria, Kibble, Bloodthirsty and the Omnivore myth. This video by Karen Becker DVM is also very informative. It’s important to remember that both kibble and raw have high levels of bacteria too (small study here).The difference being that a diet based on meat protein actually improves your dogs ability to manage bacteria levels through decreased PH levels (kibble raises PH toward alkalinity) and increases in gastric acid secretion. I think education is the key, so if possible encourage her to join some of the raw feeding fb groups as it will allow her to see that it is actually quite a simple, common, and effective diet. Raw feeding is basically just wholefood for dogs - similar to a human gaining nutrients from fresh fruits and vegetables (etc) as opposed to solely relying on synthetic nutrients such as vitamin pills. If you can locate a holistic vet or vet naturopath that would also go a long way in convincing her too. A lot of other vets support raw, but the only way to know is to ring around and enquire. It might also help to convince her if you can start to locate cheap sources and plan the diet. For example you could locate chicken/turkey frames or backs, green tripe, trimmings, heart, and organs in order to emphasize that it can be done for a low cost. The first step is always the hardest though. I remember the very first time my older dog ate chicken bone and despite doing all the research I was still anxiously chewing off my nails. So over time she may become accustomed to raw feeding and even very supportive; it just takes education and then that initial leap. :)

raw-fed-pets:

Photo 1: Whole Kangaroo carcass and 28 Whippet puppies

Photo 2: 10 minutes later..

Source


walkingthroughtheforest1991 asked
About spliting her food into two small meals, I find it a little difficult to me to do because I feed her like this: I cut a whole chicken in half and I feed her one whole half chicken. When feeding her turkey meat I usually split it into small meals since it's just meat. And finally when feeding her a large lamb brisket (to clean it's teeth) she eats it whole. After feeding her I make sure she takes a long nap to help digestion like wild animals do after eating. Am I doing it right???

Yep that should be fine. Any dog may be at risk of bloat in its lifetime so its good that you are aware of it and take steps to prevent it. Bloat can still occur even when these steps are taken, so basically dont worry about it too much. Just continue resting before/after food and when you can, try to split her meals. Being vigilant is the most important thing in case it ever does happen (hopefully it doesnt), as this will help you to react quickly.

Anonymous asked
Humans do not have an alkaline stomach, gastric acid has a pH of around 2-3

It says much more alkaline, when compared to dogs. Meaning less acidic than dogs. Not meaning it is alkaline itself.

The human stomach ph is very acidic when it is fasted. When fasted, both dogs and humans have a relatively low ph (highly acidic); which is even relatively similar. However studies show that human gastric ph spikes after a meal, to a ph higher and more alkaline than dogs. "Overall results suggest that while the gastric ph in dogs and humans is very similar in the fasted state, the initial postprandial ph peak that occurs consistently in humans appears to be absent in dogs and the ph response to meals is less predictable, ranging from no change relative to the pre-meal ph to a 2-3 unit elevation during the first postprandial hour," (Source study). Following a gradual decline, dog gastric ph was still lower than humans. They concluded that "Gastric ph and intestinal ph in the postprandial phase both appear to be more acidic in dogs than in humans".

This beagle study also found that dogs have a more acidic postprandial gastric ph when compared to humans. While ph may slightly rise, there was no statistically significant ph spike as seen in humans.These dogs were also fed a processed (carbohydrate-based) dry diet. High carbohydrate meals actually increase the ph more so than protein, and there are studies showing the effect of different foods on gastric acidity in humans. Dr Syme BVSc (hons) also stated that "In dogs and cats that eat these diets with high carbohydrate, high plant protein and lower meat protein, we find that the acidity level of the stomach begins to decrease (gastric acidity relates to meat protein), and the stomach becomes progressively more alkaline (PH 4 and above)." Thus there’s the very likely possibility of an even further ph reduction (toward acidity) in raw fed dogs - especially when compared to humans. Acidity is greatly affected by the type of macronutrients ingested.

Also there was another study by Saint-Hilaire et. al which Im going to post in a few days that directly tested gastric acidity of dogs against 29 various types of foods. No surprises, the meat and egg based meals increased volume of gastric acid secreted whereas the low protein/carbohydrate-based diets caused a drastic reduction (over 50% in some cases).

Nation’s Leading Dog Therapy Organization Shoots Self in Foot with Ban on Raw-Fed Pets

In a move that stunned its membership, affiliates and raw pet food enthusiasts across the U.S., on May 19th the Delta Society officially banned raw fed pets from their Pet Partners therapy program. Delta Society, the nation’s leading therapy dog organization, is an international effort with over 10,000 Pet Partner teams in all 50 states and several other countries.

Is a Major Player in the Pet Food Industry Behind the Ban?

I’ll let you decide.

  • On the home page of Delta Society’s web site you will find the following sentiment: "Thank you to our incredible partner, the passionate pet lovers at Purina."It’s a safe bet the Purina logo is prominently featured on other Delta Society marketing materials as well.
  • On the Delta Society’s Board of Directors, you’ll find Purina’s Marketing Director.
  • In the Delta Society Medical Advisory Group, you’ll find member Dr. Deborah S. Greco, DVM, PhD, DACVIM, of Nestle Purina Petcare in St. Louis, Missouri.
  • In 2008, Purina gave the Delta Society $400,000 – the largest grant ever received by the organization.
  • On the Purina One website, you’ll find their marketing position on "The Dangers of a Raw Meat Diet"

Click photo of above table to enlarge:

The Delta Society’s own presentation material clearly indicates two things:

  1. The dogs fed dry food have higher counts of three of the five bacteria in the study
  2. Healthy dogs, regardless of diet, have levels of salmonella and E. coli in their systems.

Using the same logic Delta Society used to ban raw fed pets from their Pet Partners program – fear of salmonella and E. coli contamination — shouldn’t all pets eating dry food diets be banned for their higher C. diff and E. coli counts?

Source: Karen Becker DVM

TL;DR Purina is taking over the world and all dogs have bacteria in their systems regardless of diet.

(Source: raw-fed-pets)


walkingthroughtheforest1991 asked
Would you please explain why kibble fed dogs are at more risk of bloat? Thank youu

Its due to the high carbohydrate content of kibble (40-70%) as many types of carbohydrates ferment and create gas buildup. Breed predisposition and other factors play a role too, but cutting out the unnecessary carbs is definitely a good step. Trypsin is an enzyme found in many meat products too, and low levels of Trypsin are also linked to bloat occurrence. ‘Higher Trypsin levels contribute to a healthier pH level in the digestive system, which is important in maintaining a healthy balance of microflora, which require a more acidic environment to survive’ (source). The same source also found that ‘According to a report on studies of bloat done at Purdue University, bloat cases have risen 1500% in the thirty year period between 1964 and 1994’. This is exactly the time frame in which krapple started to become extremely popular.

altairrr asked
Just like to let you know that we have effectively switched over to raw! They love it, and tomorrow Im going to the livestock auction to stock up c:

Yay that’s awesome, hopefully you find some bargains tomorrow. :)